NASA Insight has experienced three major Mars earthquakes due to solar panel dust

This NASA Insight Lander selfie is a mosaic made on March 15 and April 11 – the 106th and 133rd Martyrs’ Days, or Missions – with 14 images taken by the robot’s spacecraft camera. Credit NASA / JPL-Caltech

On September 18, NASA Insider Lander celebrated the 1,000th Martyrs’ Day, or Solon, by measuring the largest, longest-running earthquake so far. The quake was estimated at 4.2 and shook for an hour and a half.


This InSight is the third major earthquake in a month – August 25, Mission Seimmeter measured two earthquakes 4.2 and 4.1. By comparison, the 4.2 earthquake had five times more power than the previous record holder, with a magnitude of 3.7.

September 18, NASA Insight Lander Honored The mission measured one of the largest, longest-lasting earthquakes ever recorded in the 1000th Martyrs’ Day or Soul. The quake was estimated at 4.2 and shook for an hour and a half.

This InSight is the third major earthquake in a month – August 25, Mission Seimmeter measured two earthquakes 4.2 and 4.1. By comparison, the 4.2 earthquake had five times more power than the previous record holder, with a magnitude of 3.7.

The mission is to study earthquakes to learn more about the state of Mars. The waves change as they travel through the shells, coats, and cores of our planet, giving scientists a way to look deeper into the earth. What they learn can shed light on how all rocky worlds, including the earth and the moon, are created.

The Earth’s orbit is so far away from the sun that the quake may not be known. Low temperatures require more reliance on the heater to heat the spacecraft. Dust accumulation on InSight solar panels temporarily depletes certain equipment, reducing the amount of ground energy required for the mission to control power.

The team managed to keep the quake in the opposite direction – they used an InSight robot arm to pour sand near a solar panel, thinking that when the wind carried it on the panel, the particles would dust off some dust. The plan worked, and the team observed that the energy levels were stable during several dust cleanings. Now Mars is approaching the sun again, and energy begins to recede.

NASA Insight receives three major Mars Earthquakes thanks to solar-panel dust

InSight’s domed Wind and Thermal Shield is called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure or SEIS. The image was taken on the mission on the 110th Martyrs’ Day or Soul. Credit NASA / JPL-Caltech

“If we hadn’t taken action earlier this year, we would have lost some great science,” said Bruce Bannerit, chief inspector of the NASA Jet Proposition Laboratory at NASA’s Southern California, which is leading the mission. For more than two years, Mars seems to have given us something new with these unique earthquakes.

Temblor insights

While the September 18 earthquake is still being studied, scientists know more about the August 25 earthquake – magnitude 4.2 occurred at 5,280 miles (8,500 km) in InSight – the longest hurricane the owner has ever known.

Scientists are working to determine the source and direction of the quake, but the quake was so severe that InSight knew of all the major earthquakes that had occurred before – Serbs Foss, about 1,000 miles (1,609 km). Over the past few million years, Lava has leaked. One particularly interesting opportunity is the very long canyon system Valle Marineris, which shocked Martini Ecueter. The estimated center of that canyon system is 6,027 miles (9,700 km) from InSight.

To the astonishment of scientists, the August 25 earthquake also had two different types. Earthquake 4.2 Earthquakes are characterized by low, low frequency vibrations, and rapid and high frequency vibrations have been identified by 4.1 earthquakes. Earthquake 4.1 The quake was very close to the landlord – only 575 miles (925 km).

That is good news for psychologists – recording different types of earthquakes with different earthquakes and different types of earthquakes provides more information about the internal structure of the planet. This summer, the mission scientists used previous earthquake data to explain the depth and thickness of the planet’s shell and coat, as well as the size of the melt.

Despite their differences, the two August earthquakes have one thing in common – they are both daytime, very low – and, to the point of an earthquake, noise – on Mars. InSight earthquakes often occur when the planet cools and the winds decrease. But the signs of these earthquakes were more than enough to make any noise coming from the wind.

Looking to the future, the mission team will take into account the fact that when Earth and Mars are on opposite sides of the sun, they will not be able to carry out further dust cleaning after the merger of Mars. Because the sun’s rays can affect radio signals, it interferes with communications, and the group continues to hear orders for the September 29 earthquake, but ceases to issue orders to its owner.


NASA Insight recognizes two massive earthquakes on Mars


Presented by Jet Proposition Laboratory

ReferenceNASA Insight received three large Mars Earthquakes from the Solar Panel (2021, September 22) on September 22, 20ph from https://phys.org/news/2021-09-NASA- insight-big-marsquakes-solar-panel. .html

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