Greenhouse gas levels are still high – and that goes back to 800,000 years

In January 2020, steam will blow from the RWE Niederaussem lignite -ori power station in Bergeim, Germany. Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration By 2020, greenhouse gas emissions were on record.

Martin Miesner / AP


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Martin Miesner / AP

In January 2020, steam will blow from the RWE Niederaussem lignite -ori power station in Bergeim, Germany. Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration By 2020, greenhouse gas emissions were on record.

Martin Miesner / AP

Atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions contribute to climate change – and that goes back to 800,000 years.

According to scientists in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, carbon dioxide, one of the major greenhouse gases, will reach 412.5 million units by 2020. This is 2.5 million higher than 2019, and is now the highest, scientists say.

Copying the data is done by means of modern equipment and by looking at the major ice records from 800,000 years ago.

The report also states that By 2020, carbon offshore emissions in the oceans will be 30% higher than the 39-year-old average of 1999-2019.

Over the past year, he has also seen some record-breaking events in other climates. For the ninth year in a row, a new world record was set. With glaciers and glaciers melting, and the oceans warming up, the world’s oceans are rising by less than an inch every ten years. A.D. Global warming in 2020 was also one of the top three in the 1800s.

Climate and climate change also cause severe natural disasters, including severe droughts, wildfires, tropical storms, and rainy winters, floods and landslides.

Greenhouse gases are the cause of global warming – mainly by fossil fuels. Scientists say they need to fall sharply in the next decade to prevent extreme temperatures.

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