Government-sponsored students skip Bcom, 15 other courses during Varsity application

  • Students applying to universities and colleges have long opted to study more commercially available courses
  • These include law, engineering, information and technology, computer science, journalism, medicine, nursing and education.
  • The severe revelation of Cucumps has sparked a long-running debate over the appropriateness and marketability of some university courses.

Kenya’s 2020 Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) has dropped out of at least 16 courses when applying for university.

A freshman (R) joined Kibabi University to pursue his own choice. Photo – Kibabi University.
Source – Facebook

Courses are marketed

Students applying to universities and colleges have long opted to study more commercially available courses.

These include law, engineering, information and technology, computer science, journalism, medicine, nursing and education.

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However, according to the Kenya Universities and Colleges Central Placement Service (KUCCPS), 16 programs offered in 10 universities did not receive a single application from more than 90,000 students.

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According to the Daily Nation, the courses had a capacity of 795 students.

Still, he did not think that any of the students who would qualify for university in 2019 would be able to do so.

Courses taught by students

The courses include BS in Energy Technology, Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor of Technology in Renewable Energy, Bachelor of Architecture in Technology Building and Bachelor of Science in Automotive Technology (BCC).

Others include Agribusiness Management, BCC in Fisheries, BCC in Animal Production and Nutrition, BCC in Oceanography, BCC in Agricultural Education and Extension, BCC in Water Resources, BCC in Economics and Statistics, BD in Technology, Business and Bachelor’s, Bachelor’s Degree in Laws and Sharia And in technology.

It is understood that some courses are not marketable.

In August 2021, CCCCS CEO Agnes Wahom said 265,145 students would attend degree and technical and vocational training (TVET) classes in the 2021/2022 cycle.

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“137,072 are eligible for technical and vocational training courses and 128,073 are going on for undergraduate courses,” Wahome said on Tuesday, August 17.

On Tuesday, August 17, the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD) said that this is the seventh placement cycle since its inception.

He said we have made great strides in improving our systems and processes to increase efficiency, fairness and transparency in student placement.

Following the registration of 2020 KCSE candidates, preparations for the placement cycle began in January 2021, she said.

Errors were observed when selecting courses

The chief executive said that he made some critical observations on the mistakes of some students when choosing courses.

However, the vision revealed by Cucuspsis has sparked an age-old debate over the appropriateness and marketability of some university courses.

Many Kenyans who have responded to the growth have called for the abolition of “inappropriate” courses, saying some have not yet appealed in the labor market.

Cabinet Secretary George Magoha continued to call on the University Education Commission (CUE) to conduct an in-depth analysis of the courses, including reviewing and canceling such courses if necessary.

Source – Tuko

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