Global Going – 2021 World Hydropower Congress


The stage is now set for the world’s first hydroelectric power plant, accessible to all


Thousands are now enrolled in the fully imagined 2021 World Hydropower Congress. Previously hosted in cities such as Paris, Addis Ababa and Beijing, the three-day event is now online, three weeks long, free and available to all.

The event, organized by the International Hydroelectric Association (IAAA) from September 7-24, will show how sustainable hydropower is part of the solution to climate change. More than 30 events, decision makers, innovators and professionals prepare for the urgent need for investment to build a smart, robust, clean energy infrastructure.

“It will play a key role in destroying the sustainable hydropower economy, providing jobs and providing sustainable infrastructure through IHA,” said Eddie Rich, IHA’s chief executive.

He is once again proud to be an official media partner for the construction of the International Hydropower and Dam. As an imaginary event, the 2021 Congress is expected to attract more and more spectators than ever before. The congressional hearing about that were exactly where the 2019 IHA Blue Planet Winner was hosted by the President of Costa Rica and the ICC.

Numerous virtual sessions focused on industry professionals will help organizations learn how to integrate new industry approaches, trends and technologies. Session themes cover energy and smart technology, encourage investment, climate change, clean water management and sustainability.

Industry leaders, financiers, policymakers, government representatives, representatives from many countries, and civil society join the World Hydropower Congress. To encourage interaction between delegates, the Virtual Participation Center ensures that participants from multiple time zones meet each other and participate in online discussions.

San Jose statement on sustainable water power

In recent months, the IHA has been seeking a new manifesto for hydro power development. The San Jose Sustainable Hydroelectric, named in honor of the host capital, identifies principles and recommendations for leading new hydropower development and enhancing the sector’s contribution to energy transfer.

The statement received strong support from former political leaders, including former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turbull. If we can reduce the emissions we want and keep the global warming possible, the San Jose Sustainable Hydroelectric will provide the design and supply for the new generation of hydropower. Restrictions, ”Mr. Turbul said in a recent interview.

New Sustainability Assurance System for Hydropower

The World Hydropower Congress will also launch a new sustainability certification program for hydropower projects. Hydropower Sustainability Levels are rated for projects of any size or stage of development. This encourages and recognizes responsible project developers, and helps investors, governments and communities understand which programs meet international environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance standards.

The certification system builds on a set of guidelines and evaluation tools used by developers, operators and financiers for hydropower sustainability tools. “Hydro Power’s sustainability level encourages high-performance hydropower projects to help meet the high expectations of the major sectors,” said Mr Rich.

New tips for promoting pump storage

Initiated by the IHA and led by the United States Department of Energy, a multi-stakeholder government-sponsored Hydropower Storage Hydropower International Forum will provide future reports and recommendations on the future of pump storage water at the World Hydropower Congress.

The forum brought together 13 governments, 70 organizations, several multi-sectoral development banks and research, development and financial institutions. Reports from the forum cover policies and markets that promise to release the potential of this inexpensive clean energy storage technology.

Center for Innovations for Renewable Energy

As part of the World Hydropower Congress, IAM has launched a new platform to help companies share knowledge and showcase their latest innovations. The Center for Renewable Energy Innovation showcases innovations that fall into three broad themes: technology; Research; And environmental, social and administrative.

Some of the most exciting innovations include robots using artificial intelligence to control water efficiency and reduce maintenance costs, improve grid services, improve hydropower battery packs, and create a “fish hyperloop” designed to safely transport the fish. Dams.

Five inevitable virtual sessions for hydroelectric experts

Hydro Power Sustainability Level – How to Get a Certificate – September 9

With hundreds of gigabytes of untapped potential in the world, new and existing hydropower projects will continue to play a major role in global renewable energy production as the world’s energy grid decreases.

Launched at this year’s World Hydropower Congress, the Hydro Power Sustainability Standard helps recognize and certify projects around the world for environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance.

Solar-Hydro Power Hybrids – Reconstruction Works – September 14

Combined with floating solar energy, hydropower provides a great opportunity to increase solar energy worldwide. When treated as a single generation source, solar fluctuations and variability can be offset by hydropower, which results in water conservation, reducing driving reserve requirements and effective use of existing distribution and distribution infrastructure.

This session will bring first-hand experience from potential participants and discuss what needs to be done to open up this vast capacity of hydroelectric reservoirs. The session explores market and regulatory barriers to increasing the use of this technology worldwide.

Modernization of Hydropower – Getting More Out of Existing Resources – September 15th

Investing in existing assets can have a variety of low-impact effects: from improving aging equipment, improving energy efficiency, increasing digitalisation, reducing environmental impacts, and meeting the needs of flexible grids.

Based on projects in the sector, this session will focus on the opportunities and challenges of hydroelectric modernization by focusing on attracting more investment to modernize existing hydroelectric vessels.

Modern Water Power – Extending the flexibility of the power system – September 17

Modern technologies are now available to equip hydroelectric power stations for the current challenges: Improving fast response power, efficiency, availability and digital systems. New approaches can improve the performance of hydro assets and ensure that they can compete in new and emerging electricity markets. Building a broader understanding of the types of technology options and their potential benefits will help inform future investments in both new and existing water projects.

This session provides an overview of innovative technologies and approaches initiated by XFLEX HYDRO, an initiative of the European Union-funded Industrial and Research Partnership to enhance the flexibility of water technology. Drawing on European exhibition sites, the organizations involved in XFLEX HYDRO present the progress made through the project.

Renew, Renew or Remove – How to make the right choice? – September 20

According to ICOLD, less than 20 percent of the world’s largest dams are used to generate hydroelectric power. Compared to the construction of a new dam, redevelopment may provide a cost-effective way to generate electricity. In Europe and North America, aging hydropower ships, according to the International Energy Agency, require hydropower projects to invest heavily in redevelopment.

This session explores different life cycle options for existing dams and discusses when it would be a good decision to renovate, renovate or remove them. Regardless of the decision to redevelop, renovate, or dismantle it, hydroelectric builders and operators must consider environmental and social issues to protect river health.

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